Friday, January 10, 2020

Stanley Kubrick (Pocket Essential series)

Category: Books,Humor & Entertainment,Movies

Stanley Kubrick (Pocket Essential series) Details

Pocket Essentials is a dynamic series of books that are concise, lively, and easy to read. Packed with facts as well as expert opinions, each book has all the key information you need to know about such popular topics as film, television, cult fiction, history, and more. Stanley Kubrick was one of those rare directors who was both commercial and artistic. This is because he was not afraid to embrace traditional genres, and at the same time, stretch the boundaries of film with controversial themes—underage sex in Lolita; ultraviolence in A Clockwork Orange; and erotica in Eyes Wide Shut. As well as having an introductory essay, in this book each of Kubrick’s films is reviewed and analyzed, including his last film, the sexually-explicit and controversial Eyes Wide Shut.

Reviews

I've seen some bad reviews of this book, and author Paul Duncan's book on Hitchcock, which I find surprising. These books also 'feel' different to other reference books. Normally you have the biography from the director's point of view, then the unauthorised biography with all the dirt, then a 'making of' book, and a book all about the subtext of the movies. Paul Duncan has fused all the types of book together to give both rounded and contradictory pictures of Kubrick and Hitchcock. He has also written it in an enthusiastic 'white heat' style which I find exciting to read. These books can, and should, be read in one sitting. In the case of the Kubrick book, Duncan obviously loves the films but still has the guts to point out that A Clockwork Orange is overrated whilst Barry Lyndon is underrated. Also, he admits to not understanding The Shining - in a world full of ego-centric experts and know-alls, it's refreshing to read something with this level of informality. 'Refreshing' - that's a good word for these books. I am going to look out for more of these Pocket Essentials.

0 comments:

Post a Comment